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Run-on sentences

[8 Dec 2016] Santander bank reminds us that the run-on sentence is still trampling conventional grammar underfoot, as its online service offers up this effort: ‘At 21:42 on 02 Nov your current balance is £2,693.34, please note your current balance may differ from your available balance.’

Why is a leading bank so shameless in not knowing where to put a full stop?

The weekly newsletter of Andrew Bingham, MP for the High Peak, is a serial offender for run-on sentences. Here is one paragraph showing the blunder twice next to ‘however’: 

‘As I said during the debate, the impact on social media on all walks of life has been huge. Many of these have been good and beneficial, however as with many things in life it can and has been used by some for the wrong reasons. The abuse through social media isn’t just restricted to young people, however the impact can be much greater on teenagers than on older people.’ (3 Nov 2016)

The expression ‘it can and has been used’ is another bungle. (Read ‘it can be and has been used’, though ‘some are misusing it’ would be preferable.)

No ministerial job at the Department of Education for him!

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